Duenas murder case rests in the hands of a jury

POSTED: 5:41 PM Jul 31 2013
(img1)Duenas trial
REDDING, Calif. -

The future of Mark Duenas, the man accused of killing his wife of 33 years, rests in the hands of a jury.

Closing arguments from the defense wrapped up just after 3 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon.

Mark and Karen's five sons sat in the front row of the courtroom the whole time. The prosecution laid out their closing arguments saying the Mark had the motive, the means and the opportunity to kill Karen, while the defense fired back that from the very beginning the investigation team has looked at this case like a puzzle -- picking and choosing each of the pieces and from the get go -- singling Mark out.

Deputy District Attorney Eamon Fitzgerald went first, saying that the jury knew that Mark killed his wife, Karen. Fitzgerald said that Mark slipped when he made a 911 call, claiming that he killed his wife.

Fitzgerald went on to say that Karen had no enemies -- she was the beloved team mom. Fitzgerald said that only Mark had the motive -- a crumbling marriage, a phone relationship with another woman.

Fitzgerald said Mark used a knife, most likely from the kitchen to stab his wife while the couple's son was at the movies.

Mark also told investigators that he heard a 'gurgling' sound coming from Karen's chest which according to experts, would have placed him near her body within seconds of her death. Plus, according to the prosecution, no one was seen coming in or out of the home.

The defense fired back saying that investigators went into the case with the mentality that they already knew what happened.

Attorney Ron Powell said that the word divorce had never been mentioned between the couple and added how forthcoming Mark had been to help investigators.

No knife was ever found and no large amounts of blood were discovered on Mark.

Powell said that Mark was quick to reveal his phone relationship to investigators and he had not seen the woman since the 1970's until she testified in court.

As far as the 911 call, Powell said that the call, which at one point Mark said he did not make, was actually a slowed down version that altered his voice.

The jury had about an hour on Wednesday to begin their deliberations. They will start that back up again on Thursday beginning at 8:30 a.m.